Eviction

Jondeshia

Hello my name is Jondeshia and this is my story I wrote to the ceres courier almost a year ago and still havent found a place.
 

Tenants not offered much to relocate to new homes

Jul 6, 8:38 a.m.

Editor, 

Jon

Tenants and their supporters rallied in front of 1049 Market Street on November 12, demanding that landlord John Gall withdraw eviction notices for the building. Gall wants to convert residentially occupied units at 1049 Market to offices, a move that would displace tenants and reverse progress toward revitalizing Mid-Market. It’s the residents who keep the street alive after office workers leave, which is why the city is trying to increase housing in the area.

The California Assembly Just Took A Major Test on Tenants’ Rights. They Failed Miserably.

It was a bloodbath on the Assembly floor last week. The victims: California’s poor and working class. The winners: big corporate interests — banks, landlords, and polluters. For those who are quick to criticize the US Congress but think California’s Democrat-controlled supermajority legislature is much better, think again: when it comes to corporate control, Sacramento is caught in the tight grip of corporate lobbyists.
 
A trio of tenant bills on the floor last week paints quite the picture:
 

New Tenants Together Report Reveals that Evictions in California are Triple Previous Estimates

One statistic is always missing from any debate on California housing: the number of tenants facing eviction annually. Tenants Together, California’s statewide organization for renters’ rights, recently obtained and analyzed eviction data from the state’s Judicial Council. Although the Judicial Council collects eviction data, its annual reports do not set forth its eviction data. Given the statewide displacement crisis, Tenants Together requested the raw eviction data which gives an important window into the scope of the crisis.
 

Where Evictions Are Most Common

For many renters living in southeast Greensboro, N.C., changing addresses is an all-too-familiar endeavor. The mostly low-income residents in these communities of concentrated poverty often can’t afford to pay the monthly rent and are ultimately evicted. “We have economic and racial segregation, a concentration of social issues with bad outcomes, and families that are stretched to the limit who routinely are finding themselves in eviction court,” says Stephen Sills, who directs the Center for Housing and Community Studies at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

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